South African Society for History Teaching

History Teaching Valuables

Can Power Point enable History learners to “do History?” (PDF, 46k)

Windows Movie Maker And The Teaching Of History (PDF, 55k)

Verskroeide Aarde / Scorched Earth (PDF, 52k)

World History And Films (PDF, 23k)

Geskiedenis van provinsies ‘word deel van leerplan’

Cornia Pretorius, Onderwysverslaggewer

Time to look back without fear

MinisterofEducation,ProfessorKaderAsmal,giveshisviewson history, memory and human progress

Persoonlik

Mnr. Dewald Klaasen


18 February 2006 10:28 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
From: Sam Gellens
Horace Mann School (Bronx, NY)
sam_gellens@horacemann.org

Certainly the very accurate re-enactment of the battle of Omdurman in “The Four Feathers” (1939) is worth showing regarding Britain’s struggle with the Mahdist forces in the Sudan and the firepower of European armies. Ditto for some scenes from “Zulu” (1962).  From the Dutch side, there is the film, “Max Havelaar”, which is based on the famous novel of the same name and the plot of which takes place in Java in the 1850s.  The original Dutch film (early 1980s?) with English subtitles is hard to find on VHS/DVD so far as I know.  What about selected scenes from the French film, “Indochine”, even though it takes place, I think, in French Indochina in the 1920s? Finally, there is the wonderfully funny French film, “Black and White in Color”, about what happens when news of WWI reaches neighboring French and German colonies in Africa? It really skewers the hypocrisy of colonialism.


18 February 2006 10:29 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>

Jeff Fear
Harvard Business School
jfear@HBS.EDU

The Man Who Would Be King (Sean Connery/Michael Caine) works on a lot of different levels.
—–Original Message—–

Curt Cardwell
Drake University
cmcardwell@DRAKE.EDU

I am looking for films appropriate for a freshman/sophomore world survey course that treats the subject of 19th-century colonialism/imperialism. Early-twentieth century would also work.  The geographical area is entirely open.  Do listmembers have any suggestions?

Thank you in advance


18 February 2006 10:31 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
From:  Kenneth Wilburn
wilburnk@ecu.edu
East Carolina University

If you mean a documentary, I suggest Ali Mazrui’s “Tools of Exploitation,” Part 4, from “The Africans: A Triple Heritage” series.


18 February 2006 10:31 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
Curt Cardwell
Drake University
cmcardwell@DRAKE.EDU

I am looking for films appropriate for a freshman/sophomore world survey
course that treats the subject of 19th-century colonialism/imperialism. Early-twentieth century would also work.  The geographical area is entirely open.  Do listmembers have any suggestions?


18 February 2006 10:34 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
Ane Lintvedt
History Department
alintvedt@mcdonogh.org

The first 30 or so minutes of Zulu (the one with Michael Caine, ca. 1963) make for great conversations about imperialism in Africa.


18 February 2006 10:35 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
Monty Armstrong
Cerritos High School
Monta.Armstrong@abcusd.k12.ca.us

One series comes to mind-“Africa” with Basil Davidson-Especially Parts 5 and 6-The Bible and the Gun and This Magnificent African Cake.   The series was done in 1984 and I know some people have a problem with Davidson, but there is some great informantion and some great visuals.

Also, dealing with Southern Africa, there is the PBS Nova series “The Secrets of the Dead”. One of them “The Day of the Zulu” looks at two sides of the Battle of Isandlwana with a CSI approach.


18 February 2006 10:36 PM
H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU <H-WORLD@H-NET.MSU.EDU>
Roland Wenzlhuemer
Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin
roland.wenzlhuemer@staff.hu-berlin.de

I recently held an introductory course to the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth. In the last session of the course we watched the 1985 film “Water” starring Michael Caine. The film is an excellent satire on colonialism and many different aspects associated with it (“going native”, freedom fighters, American capitalists, environmentalism etc.). Apart from being great fun to watch, the film is rather uncompromising in highlighting the absurd logic of colonialism and imperialism.

The main drawback for you might be that neither does the film deal with 19th or 20th century colonialism (but with the 1980s and the remnants of Empire), nor is it very likely that freshmen with little prior knowledge of British or Colonial History will share many of the good laughs in the film. However, I highly recommend the film to everybody interested in colonialism.

Another option (if you have time enough) is “Lagaan” – a Bollywood production dealing mainly with the excesses of the British Raj in late 19th century India. In a very rich Indian style (with loads of singing and dancing) the film tells the story of an Indian village that suffers from the arbitrariness of the British commander-in-chief. It is
literally bled dry by the British. Only if the Indian people manage to beat the English in cricket, will the tax burden be relieved. Well, all in all a light-hearted Bollywood despcription of the Raj, but nonetheless a very enlightening one with loads of fine metaphors.

I hope this helps!